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Raspberry Pi Tutorials

Troubleshooting a Raspberry Pi HDMI/VGA Adapter

Troubleshooting a Raspberry Pi HDMI/VGA Adapter

While your monitor should be able to communicate its' abilities to your Raspberry Pi, there are times that the 'standard' that an old monitor uses is not recognised by the Pi. This is especially true with old VGA monitors for which you need to use an HDMI/VGA adaptor like the one available from The Pi Hut.  The Pi tries its best, but sometimes you have to intervene and make some manual changes. Of course, if your Pi is not displaying the image correctly, how are you going to make those changes. Fortunately, the boot partition on your SD card (assuming you...

config.txt HDMI Raspberry Pi VGA

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What is actually on your Raspberry Pi SD Card?

Have you ever wondered what is actually on your Raspberry Pi SD card? Take a look by opening the command line and running the following: cd /ls -la On the standard Raspbian SD card you will see something like the following: total 112drwxr-xr-x  25 root root  4096 Mar 23 17:36 .drwxr-xr-x  25 root root  4096 Mar 23 17:36 ..drwxr-xr-x   2 root root  4096 Mar 23 15:33 bindrwxr-xr-x   4 root root 16384 Jan  1  1970 bootdrwxr-xr-x  13 root root  3440 Jun 15 22:31 devdrwxr-xr-x 119 root root  4096 May 10 15:48 etcdrwxr-xr-x   3 root root  4096 Dec 21...

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Turning on an LED with your Raspberry Pi's GPIO Pins

Turning on an LED with your Raspberry Pi's GPIO Pins

One of the biggest selling points of the Raspberry Pi is its GPIO, or General Purpose Input/Output ports.  They are the little pins sticking out of the circuit board and allow you to plug various devices into your Pi.  With a little programming, you can then control them or detect what they are doing. In this tutorial I am going to show you how to light an LED.  In addition to your Raspberry Pi running Raspbian, what you will need is: A Breadboard An LED A 330 ohm resistor Two Male-Female jumper wires You can get all these, and more, in the...

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Renaming your Raspberry Pi - the 'hostname'

If, like me, you have more than one Raspberry Pi on your network, then it is a good idea to give each one a unique name.  If you use Raspbian, then that name is 'raspberrypi' by default.  It is really easy to change that name to (almost) whatever you like.  This name is known as the 'hostname'. First, log onto your Pi and open a terminal window.  Your Pi's name is in a file called 'hostname' in the /etc directory.  Edit that file as superuser with: sudo nano /etc/hostname This file contains only one line - the name of your Pi....

Operating System Raspberry Pi Raspbian

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Connecting to Network Storage at Boot

In my last tutorial I told you how you can access a network drive from your Raspberry Pi, but when you turn off your Pi, that network drive would disappear.  What about if you want to be able to access that network drive every time your Pi is turned on?  Of course, that is possible.  I am assuming that your Network Attached Storage (or NAS) is Linux-based, or is sharing NFS storage.  Most are - all three of my NAS drives, all from different manufacturers, are Linux-based. In the Linux world, the task of connecting to a network drive is known...

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