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Raspberry Pi Roundup

Raspberry Pi Roundup - a Sonic Pi-controlled glockenspiel, a fleet monitoring device and a satellite station model

Raspberry Pi Roundup - a Sonic Pi-controlled glockenspiel, a fleet monitoring device and a satellite station model

Glockenspiel Robin Newman has taken a 30-year old glockenspiel, some solenoids, a RasPiO ProHAT and a custom circuit and hooked it up to a Raspberry Pi. The code is in two parts: a Python part which accepts OSC signals and then communicates with the GPIO and a Sonic Pi part which deals with the actual music and sending of the OSC commands. The mechanism for hitting the glockenspiel is ingenious and starts with a solenoid and ends with a LEGO ‘stick’ which taps the underside of the instrument bars. You can see the first prototype in action below and read more over on Robin’s blog. Fleet...

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Raspberry Pi Roundup - a Doctor Who rescue mission, image recognition, steam whistles and a weather station

Raspberry Pi Roundup - a Doctor Who rescue mission, image recognition, steam whistles and a weather station

K9 Rescue Gary Taylor from Dundee’s Abertay University found an original, but water-damaged, K9 BBC TV prop in his University’s lab and, because he is an enormous Doctor Who and robotics fan, wanted to resurrect it. This formed the basis for his final year dissertation: “Creating an Autonomous Robot Utilising Raspberry Pi, Arduino, and Ultrasound Sensors for Mapping a Room”. Though only the shell survived the water-damage, caused by a hole in the Lab’s roof, Gary decided to fill the insides with new robotics equipment and also a Raspberry Pi 3 to control it. With the aid of an Arduino Mega...

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Raspberry Pi Roundup - a Pi-powered plotter, an Ivory Coast project and a bomb-disposal unit in the making

Raspberry Pi Roundup - a Pi-powered plotter, an Ivory Coast project and a bomb-disposal unit in the making

Polar Plotter John Proudlock has used a Raspberry Pi to control a vertically-mounted plotter that creates stunning artwork. Called InkyLines, the Raspberry Pi is used to read in a low-resolution image and then convert that data into movements of two stepper motors. The stepper motors control the length of two cords, thus moving the print head. See it in action below and read more over on his blog. You can see some of the artwork produced over on Instagram.   Ivory Coast Sean O’Neil wanted to help the people of one of the poorest countries on Earth: Ivory Coast (Cote D’Ivoire) by creating a...

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Raspberry Pi Roundup - a talking book, a blink-detecting camera and a multi-line hack for the Inky pHAT

Raspberry Pi Roundup - a talking book, a blink-detecting camera and a multi-line hack for the Inky pHAT

Talkback Dan Aldred runs a Raspberry Pi club and asked the kids what they wanted to create. They replied that they wanted to make a book that talks to you, or rather demands that you read it. First of all, they got hold of a book to do it with: Arnold Schwarzenegger’s biography! The game was afoot! They wired up a distance sensor to detect the proximity of a possible reader and a red LED in Arnie’s ‘eye’ on the cover to glow red if the person ignores the voice which emanates from a Bluetooth speaker. They used a tilt switch to...

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Raspberry Pi Roundup - a dual-sensor theremin, a sparkly pHAT and a bee counting Pi

Raspberry Pi Roundup - a dual-sensor theremin, a sparkly pHAT and a bee counting Pi

Theremin Robin Newman, who is an expert with Sonic Pi, has created a lovely theremin-like musical instrument using a Raspberry Pi. He has wired up two ultrasonic distance sensors to his Pi using a RasPiO Pro HAT and then created some Python code which reads the sensors and pipes the measurements into Sonic Pi to create sound. He can then vary the sound by holding his hands at different distances from the Pi. You can see it in action below and find out more about the project on Robin’s blog: Go! A programming language called ‘Go’ is pretty big news nowadays. Personally, it scares the...

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