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Raspberry Pi Roundup - a model house lighting system, white hat hacking and a celebrity point-of-view camera

Model Lighting

There are many reasons why you might want to try out your ‘hacking’ or penetration-testing skills. These range from a simple proof-of-concept as to why systems should be locked down to more aggressive hacking to prove the vulnerability of parts of a system. There are, likewise, many ways of setting up a system to be vulnerable – but you really don’t want to do this to your family’s precious PC or Mac. Enter the Raspberry Pi: it’s cheap, it’s easy to re-image the SD card and now, thanks to security expert Re4son, it’s simple to set it up as a target. On his website, Re4son provides pre-configured images to prove vulnerability – one of these, “Damn Vulnerable Raspberry Pi” is simple to download, install and switch to ‘vulnerable’ mode. Take a look on his website for the image and test your white hat hacking skills safely.

Please note: this is for experimental purposes only – it’s not an excuse to do it ‘for real’!

White Hat Hacking

There are many reasons why you might want to try out your ‘hacking’ or penetration-testing skills. These range from a simple proof-of-concept as to why systems should be locked down to more aggressive hacking to prove the vulnerability of parts of a system. There are, likewise, many ways of setting up a system to be vulnerable – but you really don’t want to do this to your family’s precious PC or Mac. Enter the Raspberry Pi: it’s cheap, it’s easy to re-image the SD card and now, thanks to security expert Re4son, it’s simple to set it up as a target. On his website, Re4son provides pre-configured images to prove vulnerability – one of these, “Damn Vulnerable Raspberry Pi” is simple to download, install and switch to ‘vulnerable’ mode. Take a look on his website for the image and test your white hat hacking skills safely.

Please note: this is for experimental purposes only – it’s not an excuse to do it ‘for real’!

Stranger's Eyes

A Swedish team has developed a system to record and stream the activity and experiences of a person via the Internet. Called Tele 2, the system is worn as a back-pack and headset by a user. A GoPro camera and a microphone is used to capture a live video stream which is then altered according to the heart rate, emotions, and sweat level of the wearer. The medical information is captured using the e-Health v2.0 board and then processed using a Raspberry Pi 3. Wearers “included Simone Giertz, a robot maker from Stockholm, Joel Kinnaman, an actor from Vancouver (and star of the RoboCop reboot), and Noor Daoud, a female drift racer from Dubai”. An impressive system – read more about it over at The MagPi and see a video of Kinnaman’s session below.



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