Adjustable Raspberry Pi Camera Mount Assembly Guide

Adjustable Raspberry Pi Camera Mount Assembly Guide

This guide will show you how to assemble the Adjustable Raspberry Pi Camera Mount & Protector. All you'll need is a simple cross-head screwdriver.

We recommend testing your camera module before fitting, to make sure the flex cable is connected properly. We also recommend undertaking this assembly on a tray or similar to avoid losing parts.

Step 1 – Snap the 5 panels out of their holders. Don't forget to peel off the protective plastic covering from all pieces:

Adjustable Raspberry Pi Camera Mount Assembly Guide Step 1

Step 2 – Pass the four longer/thinner (M2) screws through the plastic camera panel (the one with the big rectangle hole in the middle):

Adjustable Raspberry Pi Camera Mount Assembly Guide Step 2

Step 3 – Now for the fiddly bit, you need to secure the camera module to the panel with the included nuts - use two nuts per screw as this ensures the camera isn't squashed later on.

It's best to try to hold everything in your hands to avoid resting on the lens and causing damage. These nuts are small and a bit fiddly - just take your time. You may find it easier to remove the other screws and just do one at a time - whatever works best for you:

Adjustable Raspberry Pi Camera Mount Assembly Guide Step 3v2

Step 4 – Add the other camera protector layer on top and secure into place with four nuts (one per screw). Don't worry if you have left-over nuts, we included extras in your pack of parts:

Adjustable Raspberry Pi Camera Mount Assembly Guide Step 4

Step 5 – Now for the side panels. Screw the female to male standoffs on to one panels using three of the thicker (M2.5) screws: 

Adjustable Raspberry Pi Camera Mount Assembly Guide Step 5

Step 6 - Screw the remaining female to female standoffs on to the male ones like this:

Adjustable Raspberry Pi Camera Mount Assembly Guide Step 6

Step 7 – Slot the bottom of the mount into the side panel:

Adjustable Raspberry Pi Camera Mount Assembly Guide Step 7

Step 8 – You need to do a few things at once here! Fit your camera part (that we made earlier) into the long groove whilst adding the other side panel.

One everything is in place, use the remaining screws to hold it all together. We recommend locking this into place with a single screw at first - you can add the remaining screws once the camera-holder is secured in place.

This is also a good time to get the camera cable where you want it (however you like):

Adjustable Raspberry Pi Camera Mount Assembly Guide Step 8

Step 9 - Job done! Connect the camera to your Raspberry Pi and get cracking with libcamera!

Adjustable Raspberry Pi Camera Mount Assembly Guide Complete

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2 comments

The Pi Hut

The Pi Hut

@Andy The little nuts and bolts can get fiddy but we’re limited by the M2 holes in the camera module (we’d love Raspberry Pi to move to M2.5 holes, but the board would probably have to be larger to accommodate that) and our manufacturing process (we use a laser cutter not a CNC machine, so milling isn’t an option currently). The simple manufacturing process helps keep the cost down though. Thanks for the feedback, if we can find some slim M2 spacers to replace the doubled-up nuts, we’ll move to them to help make things a bit easier.

@Andy The little nuts and bolts can get fiddy but we’re limited by the M2 holes in the camera module (we’d love Raspberry Pi to move to M2.5 holes, but the board would probably have to be larger to accommodate that) and our manufacturing process (we use a laser cutter not a CNC machine, so milling isn’t an option currently). The simple manufacturing process helps keep the cost down though. Thanks for the feedback, if we can find some slim M2 spacers to replace the doubled-up nuts, we’ll move to them to help make things a bit easier.

Andy

Andy

For the Camera Module 3
One part of this design is terrible. That is the part that holds to camera module itself. The module is sandwiched between two perspex panels, and held in place by 4 very small bolts and 12 nuts. These are very very fiddly to fit, and the requirement to need two nuts stacked to make a spacer makes things even more fiddly. It’s just about impossible to spin the nuts onto the bolts without dropping them. Work over a tray to catch them!

A simple milled slot in a thicker plastic backplate would have done a much better job.
A good candidate for a 3D printer projet.

Andy

For the Camera Module 3
One part of this design is terrible. That is the part that holds to camera module itself. The module is sandwiched between two perspex panels, and held in place by 4 very small bolts and 12 nuts. These are very very fiddly to fit, and the requirement to need two nuts stacked to make a spacer makes things even more fiddly. It’s just about impossible to spin the nuts onto the bolts without dropping them. Work over a tray to catch them!

A simple milled slot in a thicker plastic backplate would have done a much better job.
A good candidate for a 3D printer projet.

Andy

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